Solomon Grundy (Born on a Monday)

 
Solomon Grundy Blackest Night
Solomon Grundy Blackest Night

Solomon Grundy 7 part series has to be one of this years sleeper story line in the comic world. In the one-shot Faces of Evil: Solomon Grundy (March 2009) by Geoff Johns and Scott Kolins, Cyrus Gold returns to life in Slaughter Swamp, as he was prior to becoming Grundy. He returns to Gotham City, but is shot by police after attacking a charity worker. In the police morgue, he transforms into Solomon Grundy. Grundy is once more an unintelligent monster, repeating the opening line of the nursery rhyme. A week later, having retreated to the sewers, he has a fight with Killer Croc. At the end of the fight, exhausted, he reverts to Cyrus Gold again. He finds himself in front of his own grave, where the Phantom Stranger tells him he has seven days to undo his curse, as “There is an unholy night coming, as black as the dead’s blood. And it’s best if Solomon Grundy was not around for it.” (A reference to the upcoming Blackest Night storyline.)

Alan Scott serves as his reluctant guide, as the story continues in the Solomon Grundy miniseries. In the count down to Blackest Night, Cyrus Gold was given one week to discover the truth of who murdered him, so he could repent for all of his sins and gain absolution. Alan Scott and the Phantom Stranger were given as his guides throughout the week. Eventually it is revealed that Gold committed suicide, meaning he forced the curse of Solomon Grundy on himself. At the end of the series’ run we see Grundy resurrected as a Black Lantern, and Cyrus Gold in hell. In Superman/Batman #66, Bizarro and Man-Bat will have to face off against Black Lantern Solomon Grundy.

Superman Batman #66
Superman Batman #66

I am glad to see the story Solomon Grundy brought to a conclusion finally in the DC Universe. Character was made in a swamp and has a differant place in the comics. Not a true villain but simple in thoughts and deeds. It would seem Solomon Grundy should not have the same fate as Cyrus Gold (his alter ego) who really was a bad person from the beginning. Maybe the DC writers will have a little mercy toward the big guy. That remains to be seen in the story of Blackest Night and in the pages of Superman/Batman #66 and #67 on sale November and December. Let me know what you think, Stay tuned comic faithful for More 🙂 Walt